Personal Chef Liability Insurance: Explained

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No longer considered a luxury or needless expense, a personal chef is now an integral part of many people’s home or work life. Preparing meals for busy families, workers or special one-off events has proved to be a rapidly growing business and the more cooking professionals who get involved, the greater the need for personal chef liability insurance.

 

Public liability insurance

Okay, so you may not fulfil the TV stereotype of the temperamental under-pressure chef, but there are bound to be little challenges, every day, which need to be overcome.

From purchasing to prepping, delivering or serving, you could be working at a number of different locations on any given day, moving hot and cold food around most of the time. Should you cause any mishap which affects one of your customers or a member of the public, you may be open to a claim for compensation. Public liability insurance covers you for such claims.

Chefs who work at their own premises could cause damage to buildings nearby due to fire or flooding or if you’re out and about in the course of your work, your business vehicle could be involved in an accident. In this case, normal car or van insurance will not provide adequate cover.

A lot of personal chefs may work at a client’s home or place of work. In that case, it’s essential that you have public liability cover in place. This will protect you if you damage kitchen equipment or cause other damage to a person’s home or workplace as a result of your cooking.

Whether you cook or prepare food at your own premises or a client’s property, there’s a risk that someone could fall ill as a result of eating your food, whether it’s undercooked or you haven’t taken into account a client’s allegories. This is where chef’s public liability comes to the rescue as it will help meet the cost of any compensation which is sought by a claimant.

 

Indemnity limits

When you buy personal chef’s liability cover, the insurer will set an indemnity limit, which is the maximum amount that can be paid out for any claim. This limit can be between £1 million and £5 million depending on a number of factors. Indemnity limits will take into account the size of your operation, the assessment of risk involved and where and when your work. Indemnity limits will affect the cost of your premiums. Considering how devastating a claim can be for any business, it’s worth making sure you have the adequate cover in place as shelling out for compensation can leave a bad taste on the mouth.

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4.9 / 5 Based on 1015 Reviews
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*Based on £1,000,000 public liability, £250,000 legal expenses & £10,000 accidental death cover for a sole trader © Copyright 2019 Tradesman Saver | Tradesman Saver is a product of Henry Seymour & Co (Barkdene Ltd) which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.Registered in England No 1842617 Insurance Brokers. All rights reserved.
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